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Published May 31st 2016

Interview: Talking Use Cases with Comms and Consulting Firm, Oot

We speak to Digital Strategist & Head of Social at Oot to learn how the Digital Intelligence Business Unit uses social data to serve a variety of clients

Part of the appeal of working for Brandwatch for me was the opportunity to work with interesting clients from all corners of the world, and learn how they use social data in their language, their cultures.

One of our good friends in Europe is the communications and consulting firm, Oot, based out of Treviso and Milan in Italy.

Part of the larger WPP family of companies, Oot has recently worked with Microsoft on a Windows 10 social campaign, and the official app for X Factor Italy.

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As part of our interview series, we spent some time chatting to Digital Strategist & Head of Social at Oot, Valentino Coletto, to understand how they use social media listening to serve their varied clients.

Coletto shared with us how the Digital Intelligence Business Unit provides consulting services and hands-on activities for market research, brand reputation monitoring, real-time crisis management, social care, and influencer marketing campaigns.

The importance of choosing the right tools

When working with such a variety of difference companies, each with different briefs and goals, Coletto stresses that they needed a comprehensive platform that would help them with a number of different use cases.

He tells us about one client in particular.

The client is an American gaming and lottery systems company, specializing in the design, development and distribution of gaming and lottery machines, as well as online and mobile gaming solutions.

The work was based around targeting influencers in gaming.

Casino Slot Machine Player Closeup Photo. Digital Slot Machine Spin. Playing in Las Vegas Concept Photo.

“We needed a tool that could help us gather all the mentions of influencers about specific topics – poker, betting, casinòs – as well as to help us troubleshoot when we saw bad behavior in players.”

In particular, they needed to understand when there were problems like ‘stalking’ different players, and ensure that there was fair communication between the company and the customers and “communication about responsible gaming activities.”

When monitoring online reputation, sophisticated organizations like Oot will reach beyond mainstream social networks such as Twitter and Facebook.

Although there is an unmissable, large volume of conversation on these channels, forums, blogs, review sites or niche social networks are equally important.

Coletto explains how his team needed to go deeper and learn more about the gaming audience. “We wanted to understand and learn about the influencers and the main topics of their conversations – not just on social, but also on forums, communities and blogs.”


Influencer marketing: still big, still important

Coletto’s team needed a tool to “tell us the actual impact of the influencers on the net, and let us identify the most impactful conversations in a daily, weekly and monthly timeframe.” 

Influencer marketing is one of the hottest use cases for social data that we’re seeing this year. Although many brands are using social for more advanced applications, like customer segmentation and product development, influencer marketing is still incredibly popular.

Brandwatch’s Influencer Marketing Manager, Ruxandra Mindruta explains why;

“The beauty of influencer marketing is its cost-effectiveness and freedom to experiment with different strategies.”

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She continues. “Marketers can afford to experiment with new ideas, adjust and refine their process.

They can try a variety of influencer identification tools, outreach platforms or analytics apps, whilst figuring out the best way to engage and build relationships with these influential groups of people.”

Misha Talavera, CMO and Co-Founder at NeoReach adds: “We live in an age of fleeting consumer attention. Broadcast TV is almost dead, 45 million Americans use ad blockers, and the competition publish more content than ever before, leaving most marketers scrambling to stay relevant.

Meanwhile, YouTube stars, bloggers, and Instagram celebrities have millions of fans hanging on to their every word. Savvy marketers are quickly catching on and plugging big dollars into partnering with these influencers and launching influencer marketing campaigns.”

Brand reputation and crisis management

Coletto’s team helped the client monitor its brand reputation and discovered the main topics relevant to the client, as well as discovering these impactful influencers.

“We gathered almost 10,000 mentions about the brand and the identified topics – we then ordered by their impact.

As well as finding these influencers, we discovered almost 5,000 topics that needed to be addressed with crisis management activities and then activated a recovery plan.”

Life buoy in swimming pool

Crisis management using social data is a theme we’ve seen throughout our interview series.

As well as one airline telling us (off the record, so I’ll have to be careful here) how they employ social listening for crisis management, Glover Park Group, one of the most well-respected public affairs and strategic communications firms in the world, talked about it to us earlier in the year.

Tackling a crisis, especially in the online environment, where information spreads at quick-fire, is often a massive challenge.

Brands and agencies that are able to adapt quickly, differentiate facts from rumours in real time, assess the situation and act upon it in a timely manner, are the ones demonstrating excellence in online customer service and reputation management.

Coletto explains how his team adopted this.

“We filtered the mentions and used the tagging feature in Brandwatch to cluster the mentions and inform the correct departments within the company in a timely manner. We routed customer care mentions to the Contact Center, and corporate mentions to PR. We also routed UX improvement suggestions to the Interactive department, for example.

The real-time alerting was particularly useful during weekends and charting specific moments, like the launch of a new promotion, or new game feature. This all helped us predict a possible escalation of a situation.”


A big thank you to Valentino for speaking with us. This interview is one in a series with industry experts – you can expect more every week.

Coming up, we’re speaking with Jaguar Land Rover, Toshiba and Spredfast on the challenges and opportunities in using social media intelligence. Stay posted.