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Published March 23rd 2018

More Tabs, Please #16: Asteroid Defence, Canadian Treks, and Stats

A weekly collection of interesting and unique reads, watches, and listens. This week there's treks in the outbacks of Canada and a site that'll teach you statistics.

Happy Friday. Our clocks are finally changing this weekend which means Bag Of Cans weather is very, very nearly here. Footie in park, cider on the beach. It seems like it’s all just a week or two away (in truth, it’s months).

This week’s album is Sleep Forever by Crocodiles:

Yodelling just isn’t enough anymore

Neon sign of the Yahoo logo

It’s always a bit off when people mock Yahoo as they bring in $1.3bn in revenue, but considering how big they once were, and how many great opportunities they missed, maybe it is fair.

The Glory That Was Yahoo‘ is a precautionary, nostalgia-tinged tale of how one of the biggest Internet companies of its time saw its influence dwindle, eventually falling to the wayside against companies like Google and Apple.

Also, side note: #BringBackGeoCities

Photo for this section by Jennifer Morrow.

Asteroids are no match for humanity’s strongest ability: exploding things to hell

A collections of stars

Ben Affleck famously asked Michael Bay on the set of Armageddon why the plot didn’t have astronauts trained to mine instead of the other way round. What he should have asked is why the entire film wasn’t just a guy in a bunker pressing a big red button with ‘LAUNCH NUKE’ written on it.

To Nuke an Asteroid, How Powerful a Bomb Do You Need?‘ is all about what the title says. And, terrifyingly, we’ve built bombs way more powerful than necessary for the job loads of times before.

Watch your step, asteroids.

Hire This Person


This week’s person to hire is Case Jernigan, an artist and animator from New York. I first came across him for his Off-Foot work, an incredible collection of animations and amazing paper cutouts based around football (as in, soccer). There’s a lot of breadth in this project from the short and sharp to the complicated and complex.

Case’s work isn’t all football based, with other work including illustration and lightboxes on a range of subjects and ideas. Deeply creative and often surreal, I love every bit of it.

Find Case’s website here and the one for Off-Foot here. You can also find him on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook. Go hire him now.

Taken From The Timeline

There’s a lot of horrible stuff going on in the world at the moment, so this week we’ve gone to Reddit and found something so wholesome and sweet it’s nearly meditative. It’s a subreddit dedicated to birds taking the train. That’s it. Nothing else. Enjoy.

Mind the gap from r/birdstakingthetrain

A lotta snow and a lotta moose

Canada gets, unfairly, joked about quite a lot, from the coppers riding around on moose to all that South Park stuff, so it’s good to read something that shows just how diverse, interesting and weird the place can get, eh.

An epic quest to find the soul of a country‘ follows a journalist as they travel all over the backwaters of Canada, avoiding anything even close to a city. From near-deserted radioactive mining towns to reclusive religious communities, this (very long) piece does an excellent job at what it set out to do.

I’d definitely prefer a Canadian road trip over an American one now.

Learning can be fun I swear

I remember statistics boggling my mind in secondary school and then eventually blaming it on why I didn’t get into the advanced maths set the next year, conveniently ignoring that I was rubbish as algebra as well.

If ‘Seeing Theory‘ was around then, it would have helped. It’s a collection of interactive lessons in probability and statistics and is nowhere near as boring as that sounds. If you’re interested in data in the slightest, you’ll love this.

You’ll never have so much fun flipping imaginary coins.

Watch And Listen

For this week we’re delving into the world of con artists, liars, and card sharks. The Grift features the writer Maria Konnikova interviewing people who have spent their lives tricking others–explaining how they got into it, how far they got, and, how they got caught.

It’s an engrossing listen, particularly because all of the con artists just seem so nice and interesting.

Check out episode 1 here.

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Crimson Hexagon has merged with Brandwatch. You’re in the right place!

From May 8th, all Crimson Hexagon products are now on the Brandwatch website. You’ll find them under ‘Products’ in the navigation. If you’re an existing customer and you want to know more, your account manager will be happy to help.