REPORT

Consumer Trends for 2020

We bring together survey and social data from thousands of people around the world to find the biggest consumer trends as we approach 2020

REPORTConsumer Trends for 2020
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Predicting the future is impossible, but research is less work than guess work.

In this report, we’re going to look to survey and public social data from thousands of people across the world to answer the following questions:

  1. What technology do consumers think will change the world most in 2020?
  2. What’s driving buying decisions around the world?
  3. What attributes do consumers look for across different industries, and what do people love and hate about brands within those industries?

Here’s a preview of what you’ll learn:

  • Plastic waste is a huge part of the social media conversation around grocery brands but, when surveyed, only 1.9% of consumers in the US think sustainability is the most important attribute a grocery brand should have.
  • While many people said they believe renewable energy will be the biggest transformative technology in 2020 in our survey, 5G, AI, and self-driving cars get way more hype on social media.
  • Respondents in the US were more likely than those in the UK to say a brand’s political stance would affect their decision to buy from them. Respondents in the UK thought the behavior of senior staff at a brand was more important.

To find out more about the methodology click here, or get scrolling to read all about our consumer trends for 2020.

1. What technology do consumers think will change the world most in 2020?

We wanted to know how people felt about the emerging or growing technologies that are going to have the biggest impact in 2020.

We chose a bunch of different kinds of tech, and compared social media conversation around them with 8,000 global survey responses on what would be changing the world most. For this survey, respondents had to pick one technology.

Social media mentions of transformative technology for 2020

Source: Brandwatch

Global survey results

Source: Qriously

5G was the winner for social media (followed by AI and self-driving cars), while renewable energy was the winner for our survey respondents (followed by 5G).

The what and the why

The cool thing about comparing survey data with social conversation around the tech is that we can start to look at both what people think and why they think it.

5G

We found a lot of positive mentions on social media making predictions about cities that will have 5G coverage in 2020, as well as the tech that will make use of it. It feels very much within reach for many countries around the world, and is probably a sensible choice for a transformative theme in 2020.

Renewable energy

Online conversation is driven by climate change fear, as well as big pledges made by politicians and particular countries (India and Australia). This is clearly a global issue, and while the effects of climate change may feel a long way off for many of our survey respondents, they’re still putting renewable energy high up the list in terms of transformative tech for 2020.

AI

Given the breadth of technology AI can add to, there’s a lot to pick out of the online conversation around it. One of the biggest stories coming from the social data we analyzed was around how Hong Kong protestors were using lasers to avoid AI-driven facial recognition technology – one popular tweet termed this “cyber warfare”.

Self-driving cars

Self-driving cars has been a big topic for a long time in future-gazing speculation. Will they become a widespread reality in 2020? Much of the conversation we found related to 5G, which is understood to be the tech that will enable self-driving cars to become a reality in all our lives. The 2020 Tokyo Olympics is rumored to be using autonomous vehicles to help with accessibility, as well as other AI-powered technology.

Regional nuances

Looking at our survey data in Qriously, we broke down each of the technologies by the countries that favored them most as a technology that would change the world in 2020. The results varied from country to country.

Which technology will transform society most in 2020?

Country The highest % of votes from this country went to... Notes on where this country over- and under-indexed
Australia 'Renewable energy' Responses from Australia were least likely of all the countries to select 'Robots'. They were more likely than respondents in other countries to vote for 'None of the above'.
France 'Renewable energy' Responses from France were least likely of all the countries to vote for '5G' and 'Cryptocurrency'. They were more likely than respondents in other countries to vote for 'Renewable energy'.
Germany 'Renewable energy' Responses from Germany were least likely of all the countries to vote for 'AR or VR'.
Malaysia '5G' Responses from Malaysia were least likely of all the countries to vote for 'None of the above'. They were most likely of all the countries to vote for 'Internet of Things', 'Cryptocurrency', and 'BlockChain'. They tied with Spain as being most likely to vote for '5G'.
Mexico 'Renewable energy' Responses from Mexico were most likely of all the countries to vote for 'AR or VR'.
Singapore '5G' Responses from Singapore were least likely of all the countries to vote for 'Blockchain' or 'Renewable energy'. They were more likely than those in other countries to select 'Robots'.
Spain '5G' Responses from Spain were least likely of all the countries to vote for 'Self-driving cars'. They tied with Malaysia as being most likely to vote for '5G'.
United Kingdom 'Renewable energy' Responses from the UK were fairly evenly split – they were not most or least likely of any country to vote for any of the technologies.
United States 'None of the above' Responses from the US were most likely of all the countries to vote for 'Self-driving cars'. They were second least likely of all the countries to vote for '5G' and 'None of the above.'
Source: Qriously

Demographic differences

Age

  • We found that older respondents (55+) were more likely to pick ‘Renewable energy’ than any other age group
  • 45-54-year-olds were more likely to pick ‘Internet of things’ than any other age group
  • 25-34-year-olds picked ‘5G’ and ‘Cryptocurrency’ more than any other age group
  • 18-24-year-olds were more likely than other age groups to pick ‘AI’, ‘Robots’, and ‘VR or AR’

Gender

  • Women were more likely than men to pick ‘Renewable energy’, ‘Internet of things’, ‘Self-driving cars’, ‘Robots’, and ‘None of the above’.
  • Men were more likely than women to pick ‘5G’, ‘AI’, ‘Cryptocurrency’, and ‘Blockchain’.
  • Men and women were equally likely to pick ‘VR or AR’.

2. What’s driving buying decisions around the world?

We wanted to know which factors consumers consider as most important when they make decisions about what they spend their money on.

For this survey, the respondent could select as many options as they wanted to.

Our respondents clearly indicated that the opinions of those closest to them were more important than other factors, although pre-purchase customer experience and online reviews also proved pretty popular.

Consumers perceive the opinions of their peers to be influential in their buying behavior, although very few thought that online influencer posts had an effect. This is an interesting conundrum for online marketers – while many report that the ROI on influencer marketing outperforms other channels, this survey seems to suggest that influencer marketing isn’t particularly effective at all. There are a few important distinctions to be made, though – firstly, what we think influences us and what does influence us aren’t always the same. Secondly, we did not specify the kinds of influencers that might affect your buying decision here. It might be that our respondents read this to mean celebrity influencers, not micro influencers (who seem to be adding a lot of value these days).

Regional nuances

Looking at our survey data in Qriously, we broke down each of the buying decision factors by the countries that felt most strongly about each.

What might affect your decision to buy from a brand?

Country The highest % of votes from this country went to... Notes on where this country over- and under-indexed
Australia 'Experiences of family, friends, or colleagues' Responses from Australia were fairly evenly split – they were not most or least likely of any country to vote for any of the factors.
France 'Experiences of family, friends, or colleagues' Responses from France were more likely than those in other countries to vote for 'Approach to sustainability' and 'Behavior of senior staff'.
Germany 'Experiences of family, friends, or colleagues' Responses from Germany were more likely than those from other countries to vote for 'Experiences of family, friends, or colleagues'.
Malaysia 'Experiences of family, friends, or colleagues' Responses from Malaysia were least likely of all countries to vote for 'None of the above' and 'Pre-purchase customer experience' (tied with Singapore). They were most likely of all the countries to vote for 'Advertising' and 'Sponsored Influencer posts'.
Mexico 'Experiences of family, friends, or colleagues' Responses from Mexico were least likely of all the countries to vote for 'Influencer Posts' (sponsored or non-sponsored) and 'Online Reviews'. They were most likely to vote for 'Pre-Purchase Customer Experience'.
Singapore 'Online reviews' Responses from Singapore were most likely of all the countries to vote for 'Online reviews' and 'Non-sponsored online influencer posts'. They were least likely of all the countries to vote for 'Pre-purchase customer experience' (tied with Malaysia).
Spain 'None of the above' Responses from Spain were least likely of all the countries to vote for 'Experiences of family, friends, or colleagues'. They were most likely of all the countries to vote for 'None of the above' or 'Behavior of senior staff'.
United Kingdom 'Experiences of family, friends, or colleagues' Responses from the UK were fairly evenly split – they were not most or least likely of any country to vote for any of the factors.
United States 'Experiences of family, friends, or colleagues' Responses from the US were least likely of all the countries to vote for 'Approach to sustainability'. They were more likely than the other countries to vote for 'Its political stance'.
Source: Qriously

Demographic differences

Age

  • All age groups cared more about their family, friends, and colleagues’ experiences than any other factor
  • Those in the 65+ category were more likely to pick ‘None of the above’ than any other age group. They tied with 18-24-year-olds as finding ‘Behavior of senior staff’ more important than other age groups
  • 45-54-year-olds were more likely to pick ‘Pre-purchase customer experience’ than any other age group
  • 25-34-year-olds and 18-24-year-olds picked ‘Online reviews’ more than any other age group
  • 18-24-year-olds were more likely than other groups to pick ‘Influencer posts’, ‘Approach to sustainability’, and, surprisingly, ‘Advertising’

Gender

  • Generally, things were pretty evenly split between men and women, although we noticed that women were more likely to select ‘Online reviews’ and ‘Experience of family, friends, and colleagues.’ Men were more likely to select ‘Political stance’.

3. Industry spotlights: What do people love and hate, and what attributes are most important?

In this section, we’ll use a mix of social and survey data to explore what consumers love, hate, and want from different industries. In the surveys listed here, respondents were asked to choose one attribute that they thought was most important for brands in that industry to have.

You can scroll through, or click an industry to skip to the insights you’d like.

Airlines (luxury and budget)

Social generated insights: Budget airlines (from US & UK conversations)

  • Delays and cancellations make up an enormous part of the conversation. This makes sense – when your plane is delayed and you have to wait around, tweeting your grievances at least gives you something to do.
  • Compared to other industries we looked at, negative conversation is far more prominent in the airline industry.
  • Despite all the negativity, passengers are willing to sing the praises of staff helping out when things go wrong. For example, we found positive comments for staff who worked past the end of their shifts to help customers.

Survey generated insights: Budget airlines (Global)

  • Every country, except Germany, Spain, and Mexico, cared more about ‘Affordability’ than ‘Quality’.
  • Germany scored particularly highly for ‘Quality’, as well as ‘Friendly customer service’, ‘Sustainability’, and ‘Innovative products or services’ compared to other countries.
  • The UK and Mexico scored highest compared to other countries for ‘Convenience’.

Social generated insights: Luxury airlines (from US & UK conversations)

  • A lot of positive conversation centers around birthdays – when people are traveling to celebrate, they’re clearly open to splashing out on a luxury airline.
  • Compared to other industries we looked at, negative conversation is far more prominent in the airline industry.
  • Again, delays and cancellations make up an enormous part of the conversation. This makes sense – when your plane is delayed and you have to wait around, tweeting your grievances at least gives you something to do.

Survey generated insights: Luxury airlines (Global)

  • ‘Sustainability’ was not a big concern at all for air travelers – this option had the least votes globally. That said, those in the 18-24 age bracket were twice as likely than other respondents to choose this option.
  • Respondents from most countries opted for ‘Quality’ over ‘Affordability’, although some made it clear that they wanted luxury airlines to be more affordable (see table in the slider below).
  • Consumers in the UK and Singapore scored highly for wanting ‘Friendly customer service’.
  • People in the 65+ age bracket were far more likely than other age groups to choose ‘Convenience’ here. They were also less likely to choose ‘Affordability’. Generally, this age group was more likely than others to pick a luxury airline – they’re happy to pay, if the service is convenient enough.

Global survey results

Source: Qriously

Luxury airlines: Did respondents in different countries opt more for quality or affordability?

Country Quality or affordability?
Spain Quality
Mexico Quality
France Quality
Australia Quality
US Quality
UK Quality
Germany Affordability
Malaysia Affordability
Singapore Affordability
Source: Qriously

Alcohol

Social generated insights: Alcohol brands (from US & UK conversations)

  • Negative conversation around alcohol brands generally contained more curse words than we noticed in other industries. There were also references to Satan and hell which didn’t appear so prominently in the other markets we researched.
  • Taste was particularly prominent in both the negative and positive parts of the conversation – negative mentions suggested particular brands tasted like urine, while positive conversation referred to ‘delicious’ drinks and combinations.
  • Positive conversation focussed on occasions for drinking, like birthdays. Words relating to ‘enjoying’ particular brands popped up, as well as how people were enjoying them – ‘ice’ and ‘Summer’ were key topics.

Survey generated insights: Alcohol brands (Global)

  • Consumers across all countries we studied care far more about ‘Quality’ than any other factor when it came to alcohol.
  • Respondents in Germany were more likely than those in other countries to choose ‘None of the above’, suggesting this country has its own specialist criteria for selecting alcohol brands.
  • Respondents in Singapore and Malaysia cared more than those in other countries about ‘Convenience’ and ‘Fast customer service’, respectively.
  • Consumers in Australia cared more than any other country about ‘Affordability’ and least (drawing with Singapore) about ‘Quality’ (although, note that ‘Quality’ was the most voted for attribute across all countries).
  • Globally, those in the 18-24 category were more likely than other respondents to opt for ‘Affordability’, and less likely than other respondents to opt for ‘Quality’.

Automotive

Social generated insights: Automotive brands (from US & UK conversations)

  • Positive conversation focuses primarily on the looks of the car – “beautiful” and “pic” (from shared Twitter images) made up large chunks of it. The act of driving was also prominent, with people sharing positive driving experiences.
  • Negative conversation focussed mainly on people’s experiences when cars go wrong – dealerships, warranties, fixing things, and things not working were big topics of discussion.
  • The term ‘money’ gets a lot of mentions within automotive brand conversation, whether that’s about spending money or garages and brands taking too much.

Survey generated insights: Automotive brands (Global)

  • Respondents from Mexico cared more about ‘Personalization’ than those in other countries.
  • Respondents from Malaysia and Singapore cared more about ‘Innovative products or services’ in auto brands than those in other countries.
  • Respondents from France cared more about ‘Sustainability’ than those in other countries.
  • Respondents from the UK cared more about ‘Affordability’ than those in other countries.

Banking

Social insights: Banking brands (from US & UK conversations)

  • Fraud was a large part of negative conversation around financial service brands – a very serious matter. Although it’s perhaps a little unexpected that people would talk about experiences with it so openly on online.
  • There were plenty of mentions of ‘wait’ in negative conversation, as well as people talking about spending time on hold and mentions like ‘minutes’ referring to how long people had been waiting. There’s clearly an opportunity for more efficiency here.
  • Employees made up a large part of the positive conversation, whether that was consumers’ positive experiences with staff, or employees advocating for the banks they work for. For example, employees publicly celebrated being part of branded initiatives that helped their communities.

Survey generated insights: Banking brands (Global)

  • Much like in the social conversation where ‘fraud’ was a big topic, ‘Security’ is the most important attribute consumers want to see in banking brands globally. Consumers in Mexico were most concerned with this.
  • Consumers in France cared more than respondents in other countries about ‘Friendly customer service’ and the ‘Quality’ of the offering, as well as ‘Convenience’. They were least likely of all the countries to pick ‘Security’, suggesting customer experience is the biggest factor in choosing a provider in this market.
  • Respondents in the UK and Australia were most likely to pick ‘None of the above’, suggesting these countries have their own specialist criteria for selecting financial services brands.
  • Respondents in Malaysia were most likely to choose ‘Fast customer service’ and scored highly for ‘Convenience’, suggesting consumers in this country want to conduct their financial business quickly.

Consumer Tech

Social generated insights: Consumer tech brands (from US & UK conversations)

  • ‘Money’ is mentioned a lot in negative conversations. Since items in this category aren’t cheap, consumers are particularly annoyed when things go wrong.
  • ‘Security’ doesn’t pop up as a large topic of conversation when people are talking about popular consumer tech products.
  • Particular company names pop up across positive, negative, and neutral conversation types – this speaks to the plurality of opinions online, and the debate on social about the pros and cons of each brand’s offering.

Survey generated insights: Consumer tech brands (Global)

  • Respondents from all countries seemed to care more about ‘Quality’ than ‘Affordability’ – they’re willing to splash the cash on tech they like.
  • That said, respondents in the US scored highest out of all the countries for ‘Affordability’. This links with our English language social data (above) that suggests money is a big issue around tech.
  • Germany, Spain, and Mexico scored highest for ‘Security’ compared to other countries.
  • German respondents also scored particularly highly for ‘Friendly customer service’, suggesting they really value a warm experience when interacting with their favorite tech brands.

Entertainment

Social generated insights: Entertainment brands (from US & UK conversations)

  • Negative conversations around entertainment brands aren’t so much about the service, but about the content – and, more specifically, content that is being cancelled. When people’s favorite shows are cancelled they are furious and communities of watchers make their voices heard. This has had success in the past with networks bringing shows back after post-cancellation backlash.
  • There’s a real appreciation for documentary content in the conversation. Several hard-hitting docs have come out recently which may be driving this, and they’re being received well. We’re likely to see more of this coming if viewer opinion is being listened to.
  • There’s a lot of debate in the conversation – from the representation of women in ‘Real Housewives’ series’ to heated conversations about the recent Michael Jackson documentary.

Survey generated insights: Entertainment brands (Global)

  • Generally speaking, ‘Affordability’, ‘Quality’, and ‘Convenience’ were the most popular attributes our respondents wanted to see in an entertainment brand. People want good content, at a good price, and they want it now.
  • Respondents in Mexico and Spain care most about ‘Quality’ and least about ‘Affordability’, compared to the other countries we studied.
  • Respondents in the US cared most about ‘Affordability’ compared to those in other countries. As we’ve seen in previous research, cost is one of the biggest concerns when it comes to cord-cutting conversation.

Fashion (luxury and streetwear)

For the fashion section, we surveyed our respondents generally about fashion brands, but we also segmented our social data by luxury and streetwear.

Survey generated insights: All fashion brands (Global)

  • All countries cared more about ‘Quality’ than ‘Affordability’, although France and the US scored higher than other countries for ‘Affordability’.
  • Respondents in Spain and Mexico value ‘Convenience’ far more than other countries when it comes to fashion.
  • Respondents in Germany cared slightly more than other countries about ‘Sustainability’ in fashion, although this topic was not a priority generally.
  • Respondents in Malaysia and Singapore scored highly for ‘Personalization’ as an attribute they value highly in fashion brands.

Social generated insights: Luxury fashion brands (from US & UK conversations)

  • Influencers involved in fashion campaigns and seen wearing particular brands made up chunks of the high fashion conversation.
  • Positivity outweighs negativity in conversations around luxury fashion brands. A lot of this positivity centers around the influential models and collaborators within different campaigns. The fashion itself also drives a lot of positive conversation (bags, dresses, and shoes etc).
  • Hearts, tears, and fire: The most popular emojis reflect a highly emotional conversation – people express their love for a look or a model with hearts and fire emojis, while tearful emojis reflect people’s reactions to the price or exclusivity of some items and their happiness once they obtain one of the sought after products.

Social generated insights: Streetwear/sports apparel brands (from US & UK conversations)

  • Protest is a big part of the conversation, with threats to boycott brands for a few different reasons. In one case, angry football fans are threatening to boycott a team sponsor because they’re unhappy with the owners of the team.
  • Footwear is a huge theme, especially in the positive conversation. There are lots of compliments for sneakers out there.
  • The top used emojis in the streetwear brands were the same as luxury fashion brands (hearts, tears, and fire).

Grocery

Social generated insights: Grocery brands (from US & UK conversations)

  • Plastic is the biggest topic of conversation around the grocery brands we studied, despite ‘Sustainability’ being very low on the priority list in our survey results.
  • Beer is a big part of the conversation for a few reasons: 1. The plastic packaging 2. Tweeted ‘Untapped’ checkins, where people rate the beers they buy from difference grocery stores.
  • Customer loyalty is a huge part of negative conversations – this comes down to customers threatening to be disloyal after a bad experience, or referencing the fact that they have been a loyal customer and have been mistreated in some way.

Survey generated insights: Grocery brands (Global)

  • France, Australia, the US and the UK cared more for ‘Affordability’ than ‘Quality’.
  • Germany and Mexico score highly for ‘Friendly customer service’, although Mexico was also most likely to vote for ‘Fast customer service’.
  • Singapore and Australia scored higher than other countries for ‘Convenience’.
  • Meanwhile, while it was low on the priority list, Germany and France scored higher than other countries for ‘Sustainability’.

Hospitality (luxury and budget)

Social generated insights: Budget hotel brands (from US & UK conversations)

  • Breakfast is a common topic in both positive and negative conversations – clearly this is a make or break issue for many guests.
  • Sleep, cleanliness of rooms, and Wi-fi issues were all points of contention in the negative conversation.
  • Staff were more likely to appear in positive conversation than negative conversation, often paired with the word “friendly”. As you’ll see in the below survey, excellent customer service isn’t a huge expectation of budget hotels. So when staff do delight consumers, they are happy to share their positive experiences on social.

Survey generated insights: Budget hotel brands (Global)

  • Priorities vary widely between countries.
  • For Mexico and Spain, ‘Convenience’ is most important for budget hotels.
  • For the UK and the US, it’s ‘Affordability’.
  • For France and Malaysia, it’s ‘Quality’ (despite the low prices).
  • Respondents in Singapore cared less than all other countries about ‘Friendly customer service’.

Social generated insights: Luxury hotel brands (from US & UK conversations)

  • Breakfast was not a common topic in negative conversations (as it does in the budget hotel analysis), although it did appear in the positive. Either it’s less of a big deal with luxury hotel customers, or luxury hotels are just nailing it.
  • In complaints about staff, luxury hotel customers were more likely than budget hotel customers to call out the manager on social.
  • While luxury hotel rooms are on the more expensive side of things we studied, money was not a large part of the conversation in the same way it is in auto- or consumer tech-related social conversation.

Survey generated insights: Luxury hotel brands (Global)

  • ‘Quality’ was by far the winner here, but there were a lot of different takes on what luxury brands should be across different countries.
  • Germany cared far more than other countries about ‘Convenience’, while the US favored ‘Affordability’ far more than others.
  • French respondents felt particularly strongly about ‘Innovative products or services’ in the luxury hotel business compared to those in different countries.
  • 18-24-year-olds were more likely than other respondents to choose ‘Convenience’ as an important option.

Restaurants (fast food and restaurant chains)

Social generated insights: Fast food brands (from US & UK conversations)

  • Politics was a big topic – there are complaints about a number of big fast food brands supporting Trump’s re-election.
  • Running out of food – a new launch of a chicken sandwich caused a lot of outrage when customers found the place had run out of them. Stock shortages in fast food restaurants have caused a number of stirs on social recently (from the Szechuan sauce controversy to KFC literally running out of chicken in the UK).
  • Vegan items like the Impossible Burger are making a big splash in the fast food conversation as people discuss new alternatives to traditionally meat-based dishes.

Survey generated insights: Fast food brands (Global)

  • Malaysian consumers scored higher than other countries for both ‘Friendly customer service’ and ‘Personalization’. A warm welcome and the ability to customize items is clearly important.
  • ‘Quality’ and ‘Convenience’ trumped affordability for almost every country. Those in Mexico, Spain, and the UK felt particularly strongly that ‘Quality’ was preferable to ‘Affordability’ compared to other countries.
  • Meanwhile, Australian respondents seemed to feel particularly strongly about the importance of ‘Convenience’ over ‘Affordability’.
  • The youngest age bracket we studied (18-24) were more likely than other age groups to choose ‘Affordability’, and less likely to choose ‘Quality’.

Social generated insights: Restaurant chain brands (from US & UK conversations)

  • Occasions are big in the positive conversation, with people talking about celebrating birthdays.
  • People are also keen to share the details of their experience – what they ate, how it tasted, who they were with, and other details.
  • More upscale restaurants, just like fast food brands, can’t escape politics. The negative conversation is full of calls for boycotts (and criticisms of boycotts) of different brands for different reasons, including animal cruelty and political affiliations.

Survey generated insights: Restaurant chain brands (Global)

  • ‘Quality’ was top for all countries, with France and Spain most likely to vote for this attribute.
  • Germany and the UK scored higher than other countries for ‘Friendly customer service’.
  • Singapore and Malaysia scored higher than other countries for ‘Affordability’ and lower for ‘Quality’, suggesting that for these consumers a restaurant meal shouldn’t be too expensive to come by.
  • Malaysia and Mexico scored higher than other countries for ‘Fast customer service’ and ‘Convenience’.

Bonus data: Regional characteristics across industries

Looking at survey results for industries generally, we were able to see the attributes each country over- and under-indexed for.

What brand attributes did countries over- and under- index for in our survey?

Country Over-indexed for: Under-indexed for:
Australia - 'Fast customer service'
France 'Sustainability', 'Affordability' 'Security'
Germany 'Friendly customer service' (tied with Malaysia) 'Convenience'
Malaysia 'Fast customer service', 'Friendly customer service' (tied with Germany) -
Mexico 'Security', 'Convenience' 'Affordability'
Singapore - 'Quality'
Spain 'Quality' 'Friendly customer service'
UK - -
US - 'Sustainability'
Source: Qriously

Methodology

Survey data

We used Qriously to survey of 8,000 people across Australia, France, Germany, Malaysia, Mexico, Singapore, Spain, UK, and US. This research took place in August 2019.

You can read more about Qriously here.

Social data

For this report, we used Brandwatch to analyze public social media mentions posted in August 2019 in English.

For the transformative technology graph, we looked at global mentions (in English).

For the industry-related data, we looked at mentions of groups of brands within each industry on Twitter, coming from the UK and the US, and in English.

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